Many cultures throughout the world use healing techniques that focus on the flow of energy within and around the body. These include polarity therapy, reiki, healing touch and the craniosacral system.

Energy healing works with the dynamic electromagnetic field to release distorted energies and align them to their natural balance. This allows the body to heal itself and reduces the need for pharmaceutical medications.

Energy Fields

Scientists have begun to measure energy fields that are associated with the body and it appears that these energy patterns can be changed before the changes show up on a physical level. This is important information because if diseases can be detected on an energetic level it could save lives and money if we knew that these changes can be prevented by changing the energy field before they manifest as organic pathology.

Practitioners of yoga, tai chi and qigong believe that the human energy field, also known as the auric field or personal electromagnetic field, is what holds the blueprint to health and wellness. When these energies are flowing smoothly, the body is healthy, but if they become blocked or out of balance, the entire system is affected and disease is created.

Healers work to restore the flow of energy in these areas by using a variety of techniques. Polarity therapy, for example, uses contact points to release painful holding patterns in the body’s energy field. In this way, the body can return to its natural energy flow and heal itself.

Other practitioners use a technique called “Energy Field Healing” to help clients detect and release blocked energy. In this form of healing the practitioner uses his or her own ability and quite specific training to communicate with a client’s human energy field. This allows the healer to sense distorted energy fields and locate the area of the body where the pain is located, then with gentle flowing hand movements releases the suppressed energy and encourages its natural flow.

EM Practitioners

EM practitioners use energy fields to help the body to heal itself. They are trained to feel vibrational frequencies with their hands, and align the biofield through healing treatments. This allows the patient to become more in tune with their own subtle energy rhythms.

Symptoms of disease show up as anti-coherent patterns in the EM field. The sub ELF-EMF vibrations emitted by the hands of an EM practitioner can retrain these frequencies back to their normal vibratory state. This helps to bring the body’s systems (neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrinal and emotional/psychological) back into balance. Gentle changes in body movement exhibited in EM practices such as Alexander Technique, Feldenkrais and yoga also assist with this process.

In the emergency department, EM physicians deal with a wide spectrum of medical conditions on a daily basis. They often deal with trauma and injuries, but also see patients with common problems such as URIs, coughs, sore throats, rashes, cellulitis and abscesses.

A career in EM can be rewarding, but it is important for potential applicants to research the specialty thoroughly before applying. This is especially important if they plan to pursue a particular EM fellowship. For example, sports medicine fellowships focus on the non-operative treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Other popular EM fellowships include wilderness medicine, which deals with issues such as tropical and travel medicine, altitude-related illness and envenomation.

EM Treatments

In EM healing, the practitioner senses imbalances in the electromagnetic field (HEF) before they manifest physically as symptoms of illness. Using techniques that involve tapping, massaging, pinching, connecting or swirling the hands over energy points or meridians on the body; tracing or moving the hand over an area of the body to bring healing energies there; or surrounding an area with healing energies, practitioners restore balance in the HEF.

A variety of EM therapies have been shown to reduce stress and pain, enhance immune system function and enhance mood. These include reiki, where the practitioner uses 12-15 specific hand positions for a few minutes on the patient’s clothed body; and Etheric Mindfulness (EM), which is based on mindfulness meditation, with the added use of visualization and affirmations.

Other energy medicine therapies, such as EMDR, use visualization and imagery to help the brain reprocess traumas and traumatic memories so that the body can resume its natural healing processes. EMDR also helps to heal emotional distress and psychological disturbances through the reconnection of energy systems with the brain, heart, meridians, chakras and biophotons.

EM Future Perspectives

While allopathic medicine focuses on the physical aspect of the human body, energy healing (EM) uses subtle energies to help bring balance and wellness back to the body. This is done by directing coherent, harmonic energy into distortions caused by stressors and disease. This is accomplished through either human touch or energy healing devices, which emit known subtle energies to assess and treat energetic imbalances.

EM technology can be applied in areas such as antibody drug discovery, epitope research, and engineering transformation. It is also being used in foot and ankle nonunions, such as proximal fifth metatarsal fractures, Jones fractures, and diaphyseal stress fractures.

The newer science of quantum physics supports the concept that our world is not only governed by mechanistic laws but by an invisible, intangible energy field. This may explain common experiences such as the “mechanism” of healing, as well as the “non-local reality” that some physicists describe that explains why objects can affect other objects even though they are not touching them.

In the future, EM will be able to bridge the gap between allopathic and energy medicine by understanding how cellular voltage potentials (VPs) relate to health and wellness, as well as the overlap between the endocrine and chakra systems. This will help EM therapeutically enhance psychoneuroimmunology (mind-body medicine).